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William - Name Meaning, What does William mean?
What does William mean? W illiam as a boys' name is pronounced WIL-yum.It is of Old German origin, and the meaning of William is "determined protector".From wil meaning "will", "desire" and helm meaning "helmet", "protection". For a long time after the Norman conquest in AD 1066, three out of four English boys were given some form of the conqueror's name, William.
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William - Wikipedia
William is a popular given name of an old Germanic origin. It became very popular in the English language after the Norman conquest of England in 1066, and remained so throughout the Middle Ages and into the modern era. It is sometimes abbreviated "Wm." Shortened familiar versions in English include Will, Willy, Bill, and Billy.A common Irish form is Liam.
William Shakespeare - Wikipedia
William Shakespeare (bapt. 26 April 1564 – 23 April 1616) was an English poet, playwright, and actor, widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language and the world's greatest dramatist. He is often called England's national poet and the "Bard of Avon". His extant works, including collaborations, consist of some 39 plays, 154 sonnets, two long narrative poems, and a few other ...
William | Definition of William at Dictionary.com
William definition, a word formerly used in communications to represent the letter W. See more.
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William - Wiktionary
A male given name popular since the Norman Conquest. 1605 William Camden, Remains Concerning Britain, John Russell Smith, 1870, page 98: This name hath been most common in England since King William the Conquerour, insomuch that upon a festival day in the Court of King Henry the Second, when Sir William Saint-John, and Sir William Fitz-Hamon, especial ...